⌛ Theme Of Humanity In Lord Of The Flies

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Theme Of Humanity In Lord Of The Flies



Voldemort makes his debut The Pros And Cons Of Sports Drinks Harry Potter Theme Of Humanity In Lord Of The Flies the Philosopher's Stone. Unfortunately, when the boss turns out to be an inept General Failure who's more interested in juggling the Villain Ball than actually succeeding, the Starscream becomes fed up with the boss's idiocy and decides that the villainous organization would be more successful with him in Theme Of Humanity In Lord Of The Flies. Community Theme Of Humanity In Lord Of The Flies. High Moff Morlish Veed Theme Of Humanity In Lord Of The Flies the same series is a more traditional example, though his own shortsightedness means he generally winds up a pawn for more competent players. Piggy and his upper-class schoolmates are marooned on a remote wild island. Simon, in Theme Of Humanity In Lord Of The Flies to supervising the project of constructing shelters, feels an instinctive need to protect the "littluns" younger boys. Starr:

Why should you read “Lord of the Flies” by William Golding? - Jill Dash

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Lina Ell Follow. English Teacher at Dunellen High School. Lord of the flies. Vhs mod 2 nun's priest's tale. Phantom of the Opera. The Canterbury Tales. Beowulf and Medieval Poems. The Giver. Related Books Free with a 30 day trial from Scribd. Germany, September Elsevier Books Reference. Related Audiobooks Free with a 30 day trial from Scribd. What Happened To You? Mudassar Rana. Tayyaba Tabassum. Iswarya Ragupathy. Zaher Nourredine. Susan Might. But by January my parents had seen enough of my inner ethical turmoil. They wanted to shore up my confidence. A four-year-old needs a foundation for his values in the absence of primary love.

Yes, you guessed it: it was a substitute; an ideal false self. And that Brass Ring, which gave me a traumatically Impossible ideal to live up to in order to be a Number One Son in their eyes, was psychologically destructive And its inner violent duality was at the heart of my psychological collapse in BUT - its mature, adult worldview was always ALL that stood against me - and the moral entropy and outright violence of a Piggy, towards whose personality I had been drifting by the age of four.

So WHAT if it turned me into a slightly funny lifetime Aspie and hence victim of all the symptoms of bipolar disorder? I maintained my values intact. View all 7 comments. Feb 25, Mk rated it did not like it Recommended to Mk by: required high school reading. I hated this book. First off, as I remember, it talks about humans failure to govern ourselves, or more broadly the failures of human nature.

There are a few reasons why I think simply dropping a group of kids on a desert island does not in fact prove anything. The first thing they do is appoint leaders. As someone who spends my time working in consensus based groups seeking to challenge hierarchical structures, I have a stro I hated this book. As someone who spends my time working in consensus based groups seeking to challenge hierarchical structures, I have a strong belief that this is not how things need to be. It takes a bunch of unlearning and relearning to use these formats - simply being in a new space or being a child does not do this work. The author and the children he writes about are a part of a specific culture, and it's incorrect to generalize these values to a broader concept of human nature.

Again, socialization yes, even of a 6 year old plays a huge role in what behavior we see as appropriate. While it's quite true that men or at least masculinity control government, it's ridiculous to use only boys to extrapolate what ways of governing ourselves are possible. I read this book in when I was a freshman in highschool, so maybe there's something I missed. Or maybe my memories are being colored by just how gross the pig's head descriptions were. If so, feel free to correct me. For now though, I have to say that this book is offensive and makes dangerous assumption. View all 76 comments. Jul 31, Lyn rated it really liked it. Years after I read this masterpiece, it is still chilling. Golding spins a yarn that could have been told centuries ago, primal human nature unmoored from civilization does not take long to break away and devolve into a feral thing.

As good today, and as haunting, as it was when it was published in This should be on a list of books that must be read. A British airplane on fire crashes on a deserted isolated South Sea's island, in the middle of an atomic war set in the near future. All the grown-ups are killed and only children 12 and younger survive, how are they to cope basically an allegorical story of what is human nature , good or evil? Ralph is chosen leader, "Piggy" his intellectual sidekick he wears glasses, this beautiful green tropical coral isle with a blue lagoon magnificent palm trees, better yet coconut trees too and plent A British airplane on fire crashes on a deserted isolated South Sea's island, in the middle of an atomic war set in the near future. Ralph is chosen leader, "Piggy" his intellectual sidekick he wears glasses, this beautiful green tropical coral isle with a blue lagoon magnificent palm trees, better yet coconut trees too and plenty of yellow bananas, other fruits are seen.

Wild numerous pigs in the forest, plenty of fish in the ocean so no worries right Ralph has a rescue fire set which goes sadly out of control , and one of the boys is never seen again, Jack doesn't like playing second fiddle to Ralph. He takes his group of choirboys followers and leaves, to form a new fierce warrior tribe on Castle Rock, painting their faces and becoming great hunters Since Piggy's eye glasses are the only way the kids can start a fire, Jack raids Ralph's shelter and steals it, the poor helpless boy can't function without them, blind as a bat I know it's a misnomer, but it sounds great.

Complicating the situation is the mysterious "Beast," on the mountain is it real? Or just a legend Earlier Simon sees the evil head of a large boar on a stick , in the middle of the forest Lord of the Flies. He has a haunting vision and flees towards the children, scaring them all. In the darkness they believe it's the beast and have to defend themselves, with whatever weapons they possess..

Later the two"tribes" struggle for supremacy on the island Will the wicked inherit the Earth? And maybe the last outpost of civilization left is here This novel is a superb narrative of today's nations wars of conquest, anything is good as long as your side wins Jul 24, David rated it did not like it Recommends it for: cynical, pessimistic people, and students in English boarding schools. I just don't buy it. This book is famous for unmasking what brutes we are, just under the surface, but, well, for all the hype, it just isn't convincing. People--even teenage boys--just aren't as savage as Golding seems to want us to believe, and nothing in this book persuades me otherwise.

Perhaps if I'd gone to English boarding school I'd feel differently--but then that's the real irony of this book, that the brutality from which the British Empire was supposed to save so many people and culture I just don't buy it. Perhaps if I'd gone to English boarding school I'd feel differently--but then that's the real irony of this book, that the brutality from which the British Empire was supposed to save so many people and cultures was in fact the Brits projecting their own savagery onto others.

But the rest of us, no, we aren't monsters underneath. A little messed up, maybe, a little more raw, but nowhere near the kind of brutes that Golding wants us to believe. View all 61 comments. The experience was excruciating. Tried last year and the first 30 pages were so painful. Did a lot of research on this book spoke to a couple of people as well and I feel like if I don't get through it this time around, I probably never will. However now, Rory Power is bringing out a book coming July called Wilder Girls, with I heard is a feminist retelling of this. I'm hoping to compare the two, so this might just be the push for me to finally read this one : You can find me on Youtube Instagram Twitter Tumblr Website View all 24 comments.

I was Piggy well, in personality at least, though not in portliness. I hated everyone who picked on him. I still do. Should people be forgiven for what they do on a deserted island? That depends on whether you think their true nature has revealed itself, or their humanity has been corrupted by circumstance and stress. In a world where almost every human trait is now considered a product of both nature and nurture, would Golding have written his tale differently today? No, I don't believe so. H I was Piggy well, in personality at least, though not in portliness. He was quite ahead of his time to believe some of the boys, though certainly not the majority, still remained moral despite the situation. The question is, what would have happened to me?

It was impossible not to wonder after I read this book. View all 14 comments. After that, I began wondering how I would respond to the other books I had to read and analyze as a youth. Hence my rereading of Lord Of The Flies. Both books are deserved classics. I don't regret a moment spent rereading either one. So… perhaps this will become a series. A Separate Peace? Anyhow, on with the review What do I remember from my first reading? After a plane crashes, a group of English boys finds themselves stranded on an island and, with no adults to guide them, form a kind of society that quickly breaks down, resulting in madness and murder.

I knew a couple of children died, and that eventually the rest were rescued. What do I appreciate now? And though there are lots of vivid descriptions of clouds, forests and sun glinting on sand, nothing is gratuitous. Perhaps he was raising sons at the time. Is this a fact of nature? But the fact that everyone, from the oldest to the youngest, teases him, is very disturbing. How do we make a society work? Is hunting to feed us more important than providing shelter or coming up with a way to be rescued?

And Ralph knows that if he blows the conch and no one comes, it will be irrevocable. Brilliant observation. Or do we create monsters as a mere projection of our own fears? Golding cranked up the tension to Even though I knew how the book ended, I was still turning every page, heart thumping, hoping Ralph survived being pursued by Jack and his gang.

I can imagine a million students underlining that with a big "Aha! It's there. Once read, it has the power and heft of something that is so true and essential that it must have always been around. But, and here's the weird thing, I think this book is better appreciated as an adult. Younger people are so caught up in the immediacy of every complication. I remember studiously talking about themes before I fully understood them from life. Adults, because we've lived through decades, can recognize the patterns of behaviour, the archetypal figures looming behind bullies and visionaries, both in private and public life, that emerge so strikingly in this book. Finally: why haven't I read more William Golding? View all 57 comments. Over the years I must have read this book five or six times.

Last night I was reading it on a train with a highlighter in my hand, because I decided to teach it this year again. Teachers wreck books, of course. We all know that. On the other hand, whatever you have to study-read, you tend to carry a bit of it with you. You don't forget that book, at least. Although I must add, that it's quite risky introducing to a Scottish classroom a book with the memorable words: "The English are best at ever Over the years I must have read this book five or six times.

Although I must add, that it's quite risky introducing to a Scottish classroom a book with the memorable words: "The English are best at everything I must have read it for the first time 30 years ago. Published in , the phrasing would have been pretty modern then. Even now, most of it has work well. The phrase that jumped at me -- and it only appeared once -- was when Piggy I think compared the boys detrimentally to 'niggers', instead of just 'savages'. Mental note to make them look hard at this bit. After all this is such a horrible little group of boys.

As complacently white as can be, one group of them from a choir school or a public school with a choir , no less. And Ralph, the 'hero', son of a naval officer. Golding, as a teacher in an upmarket school, presumably knew those sort of boys all too well. The boys being prepared to carry the empire forward. Except the setting suggests the empire may not be going forward. Somebody somewhere is fighting a war that is evidently nuclear. It's never quite clear what is going on or how the officer turns up cool as cucumber on a naval cutter at the end. Most of the young people in my class this year have sigh seen the film, so they know what happens. The group of boys marooned on an idyllic Pacific Island first start off having a sort of cheery adventure. They want to have fun, and one of their number -- Jack -- talks a great deal about 'fun', though his idea of fun is killing pigs.

They arrive a fairly civilised little group but they gradually degenerate. Golding's moral message is about the "darkness of man's heart" and it's a good moral companion to Heart of Darkness now I come to think about it. The boys natural fears escalate and the younger children create a mythical 'beast', which then seems to materialise as a fact when the body of a dead airman, killed a war fought in the skies overhead, floats down to the island in a parachute. But the real beast is their own desire for control and domination, as well as an interesting bloodlust -- the word 'lust' is used of this, and the killing of the first pig is certainly described with unmistakable sexual resonance.

One of the boys pushes a sharpened stick "up her ass". There are no girls in the group -- what a different novel it would have to have been if there were! What a strange, strange thing to put into your novel. Not just the killing, but the slaughtering of a mother pig and a kind of sexual frenzy. But hey -- he's intending to shock. He's intending to show that this blood lust thing isn't far away from human kind, or male human kind at least, and that it doesn't take much to call it out. Even Ralph, the Aryan protagonist, feels himself getting caught up in it. Paint your face, start whooping and chanting and you can do, it seems, almost anything. The kind, poetic, imaginative Simon gets butchered teeth and nails at this point -- not spears.

PIggy is despatched by Roger, the executioner. The whole of their little society is clearly turning into a Stalinist regime, with each boy taking his place, as prescribed by Golding, which is what you get to do when you write an allegory. It's a powerful read, though more repetitive, in linguistic terms, than I remembered - almost as repetitive as D H Lawrence in places. At the highpoint, towards the end, when Ralph is completely isolated and being hunted down, the word 'ululation' is done to death. But at least you can't read this book without learning what it means!

What I both like and don't like about it is the way it makes me want to argue. The whole thing is completely manipulated. Is this what would happen? Would the darkness of man's heart take over? I have not much doubt that man's heart is dark, I guess, but when I got off the train I left my very lovely reddy-orangy furry scarf, and the chap who was sitting opposite me I didn't speak to him during the journey ran after me with it. It brightened my day. Perhaps he was a 'Simon' and would quickly get trampled if our civilisation were to decline. But look Golding, my lad -- that bit where you allow the man in the parachute to get dumped, dead, on the island, scaring the boys out of their wits -- if that hadn't happened -- your choice plot element -- well, the three boys Jack, Roger and Ralph, would have established Absence of Beast.

It might all have turned out very differently. If Piggy hadn't been wearing glasses, there would have been no fire If it had started raining sooner If Ralph had been a bit more intelligent If the pigs had been a bit better at getting away On an island, living on fruit and getting scratched and cut, one or two of them would have developed fatal infections and their main enemy would probably have been illness and death, which would have drawn them together a bit. Even the biting insects would probably have driven them potty. One or two of them, it's my bet, would have descended into depression and just dwindled away. It wouldn't have been like The Coral Island , but it wouldn't have been the inevitable collapse of civilisation either.

Steven King likes this book. It fits beautifully with his love of dramatic thriller, increasing isolation of central brave character, and underlying opposition between good and evil. Here evil wins, though. Ralph is about to be exterminated when the officer arrives, so the deus ex machina is just there as an ironic way to end the book. That bastard is even 'embarrassed' when Ralph bursts into tears. That's British stiff upper lippery for you. I don't believe, in the boys' behaviour. I don't believe that Jack, the killer I nearly said Jack the Giant-Killer , is there just below the surface, although I do believe that wars bring out the worst in us. I don't believe that Roger -- just a little boy -- is the natural henchman, with a desire to execute his peers running just below his veneer of civilisation.

But then perhaps I do. I've seen it, haven't I? Seen nasty young people doing nasty young things nastily. Conditioned into that, in their turn, by not very delightful adults, damaged adults. Oh bloody Golding -- go away! I put my money on man's intelligence. You gotta use your head to survive, whichever allegory you seem to be inhabiting. And sometimes you do survive and sometimes you don't, but the 'darkness of man's heart' is offset by the light, which always returns. The trouble is, the dark heart goes for power - doesn't it?

And the desire for power and control over others can be wielded quickly and wrongly by just a few people. It's what's happening all over the world at this minute. And yet -- the majority are good-hearted souls, who will pick up your scarf on a train and return it to you. There are more good guys than bad ones. Some of them are quietly and happily reading books at this minute. Otherwise, what would be the point? Aug 22, Andrew rated it really liked it. I was tempted to give this five stars, since in so many ways it strikes me as the kind of masterpiece, like Heart of Darkness, that I imagine will retain its horror and readability for centuries. The prose veers or as Golding would say it, "tends" from plain to painterly.

The story is well known: a sort of allegorical morality play set in modern times -- fancy English boys left to their own devices don't so much as revert to darkness as discover primitive outlets for the darkness reflected in I was tempted to give this five stars, since in so many ways it strikes me as the kind of masterpiece, like Heart of Darkness, that I imagine will retain its horror and readability for centuries. The story is well known: a sort of allegorical morality play set in modern times -- fancy English boys left to their own devices don't so much as revert to darkness as discover primitive outlets for the darkness reflected in their greater society. This is what I love about Heart of Darkness: try as one might, Kurtz cannot be pigeonholed into good or evil.

He is excellent at what he does, and what he does is evil. Kurtz is a true reflection of what excellence was to Colonial Europe, and in so far as Colonial Europe was good, cultivated, honorable, and esteemed, so is Kurtz. Kurtz isn't good or evil; he is true. Golding's version is darker. It centers mostly around the corrupting power of urges to overwhelm social order. Freudian criticism abounds, but the parallel I kept coming back to was Rome. I found that Piggy, no matter how truly annoying he is another brilliant stroke by Golding is to make Piggy strangely unsympathetic , recalled those numerous Republicans of the Early Empire who advocated in a shrill but useless manner for a return to Senate rule but were shunted aside and usually killed by deranged sociopaths who behaved quite like like Jack.

But be it Freudian or historic, any framing of this book feels cheap and hollow because the story has such a complexity of primal urges that it feels almost biological. Golding said he came up with the idea of book after reading his children "Treasure Island or Coral Island or some such Island" in the years of the hydrogen bomb and Stalin and asked his wife, "why don't I write a children's story about how people really are, about how people actually behave? Its portrait of sadism could have been lifted out of the newspapers; its struggle for dominion over the weak is an almost sexual frenzy recalls everything I know about torture in the dungeons of Argentine or US military prisons. In this respect, I think the book, like Heart of Darkness, is timeless.

The martyrdom of Simon, I felt, demeaned the human quality of Simon. I liked him best because he struck me as the most shrewd and practical. When he comes down to the beach mutting "something about a body on a hill" Simon ceases to be a reflection of human complexity, or biological completeness, and instead becomes a rehashed precedent from Sunday school. I've often felt that Heart of Darkness' genius was that it somehow reflected the effect of Darwin and modern thinking on the antiquated ideas of Colonial Europe, ie Kurtz isn't good or evil because good and evil are artifices that wilt beneath analysis. When Golding adheres to this materialist perspective, the book is masterly. When he swears allegiance to worn out Christian parables, that complexity is reduced to slips of paper.

View all 5 comments. Jan 27, J. Sutton rated it liked it. In William Golding's Lord of the Flies, the dark side of human nature goes unchecked. This leads to the devolution we see among the boys who are stranded on an uninhabited island. Whether or not you agree with Golding's central idea here, it is a well written and interesting novel. I'm not sure what my thoughts were at the time, but I remember having read the story sometime in junior high school. I'm perhaps a bit more cynical of this breakdown in society now or perhaps not!

I saw parallels to In William Golding's Lord of the Flies, the dark side of human nature goes unchecked. I saw parallels to JG Ballard's work, but, even if it is simply a high-rise apartment, Ballard's take on society seems more complete. Golding's unrelenting attack on reason and how easily it can be displaced begins on the opening pages and continues until the boys are rescued. For me, that played not quite successfully against an engaging story. Jun 01, Gothadh rated it did not like it.

I absolutely hated this book. That's my over-riding memory of it I'm afraid. I had to read it in secondary school when I was about 12 and I never remember disliking a book so much which was surprising as I was a voracious reader. I just could not relate to the story at all and just wished they would all kill each other as soon a I absolutely hated this book. I just could not relate to the story at all and just wished they would all kill each other as soon as possible so the book would finish.

The fact that we had to read the book in class at the pace of some of the slower readers agonisingly painfully slow readers and then discuss it afterwards, which was like trying to get blood out of a stone, probably didn't help. Never, ever again. View all 27 comments. I think reading this book as an adult affects me more. You come to realize that things and circumstances can change drastically with no rules or repercussions. I really loved Lord of the Flies and think everyone should read this one day. It's not a long book but it will make an impression on you. It makes you think and dread what would happen if With no rules to govern, you can easily see how a group will follow the stronger and more manipulative leader.

Let it be a lesson to us all to always have a sense of morality and know when as a society we've crossed the line. Recommended to everyone!! Lord of the Flies is a parable of the human nature… His mind was crowded with memories; memories of the knowledge that had come to them when they closed in on the struggling pig, knowledge that they had outwitted a living thing, imposed their will upon it, taken away its life like a long satisfying drink.

Ever since primordial times man is ruled by two opposite forces: a wish to create and a wish to destroy… And to destroy is much easier than to create… There was the brilliant world of hunting, tac Lord of the Flies is a parable of the human nature… His mind was crowded with memories; memories of the knowledge that had come to them when they closed in on the struggling pig, knowledge that they had outwitted a living thing, imposed their will upon it, taken away its life like a long satisfying drink. Ever since primordial times man is ruled by two opposite forces: a wish to create and a wish to destroy… And to destroy is much easier than to create… There was the brilliant world of hunting, tactics, fierce exhilaration, skill; and there was the world of longing and baffled commonsense.

View 2 comments. I was considering giving this book 2 stars at about halfway through. I was bored. Then I read the second half and woah it took me by surprise. I had so many feelings reading this book; sadness, anger but also happiness and at many points yes, I was confused but it only made me want to read on to know more. Sep 22, Natalie Vellacott rated it really liked it Shelves: classics. This book shocked me. Not so much because of the content, I will come onto that, but because my gentle, kind, mother recommended it to me. My mum who mutes the TV when a swear word is coming up and who can't stand any type of violence recommended a book that involves children killing each other.

Perhaps in her case familiarity has rendered the content less offensive--she studied it in high school and it had her childish scrawls all the way through, also entertaining! That said, there was a lot t This book shocked me. That said, there was a lot to this book. I can see why it has become a classic. I guess, I was just taken aback having started the story and expecting it to continue in a Peter Pan type "lost boys" style A group of boys are abandoned on an uninhabited island. Ralph takes the lead and formulates a rescue plan. But it isn't long before the group are embroiled in internal conflict as they battle for supremacy and status.

What is really needed is for them to band together and for everyone to do their part to keep the group alive and alert any ships that happen to be passing. But they cannot even get that right--those meant to be tending the fire are off hunting pigs when the first vessel draws near. The divisions widen over time as some of the children begin to adopt savage-like behaviour resulting in tragedy. It is not a Christian book but there are a great number of spiritual analogies and lessons worthy of comment.

The book reminds us that children do not learn sin from their parents. They are born sinful and if not disciplined, given appropriate boundaries and taught right from wrong, they will choose sin as it is predetermined due to the fall--"born in sin and shapen in iniquity. There is also a lesson about the pack mentality. How much easier is it to fall into sin or temptation in a group than it is alone? When young people goad, dare and egg each other on they can be capable of great evil--peer pressure is a powerful force. We see it in the media when a group loses control and in a violent frenzy attacks a person in the street. But we will not ultimately stand before God in a group but by ourselves to account for our behaviour.

It is why the Bible warns us about the company we keep and who we choose to be our friends. I was also reminded of the damage that can be done to children who spend too much time playing video computer games. They become lost in their own worlds of darkness where theft, violence and killing are normalised and those who murder are heroes not criminals. Lord of the Flies made me realise how easy it was for these children to begin playing a very dangerous game with life and death when they became immersed in their own world and had lost touch with reality.

Maybe it will make some parents think about what their children are filling their minds with alone in their bedrooms. We shouldn't be surprised when the same children translate their video game world into a murderous rampage on our streets. That is what they have been taught to do! The last chapter of the book was for me the most impactive as the sequence of events was unexpected. The narrative is chilling in places but definitely held my interest and I wanted to know what happened to the children in the end.

There are a few swear words in the book but nothing major. There is no sexual content. There is some graphic violence and animal slaughter. This book is not really suitable for younger children but may hold lessons for older teens. I would recommend the book for Christians for the spiritual lessons that can be learned but it is not particularly uplifting! View all 8 comments. This was a great read in my opinion. I enjoyed it from the first to the last page. The story explores group polarization as the stranded youths slowly regress into a primitive state.

Frictions demonstrate the social pressure as division occurs and give rise to the psychological dilemma of 'the power of the situation'. The book also explores irrational fear and imagination as it relates to the group-think concept. For some reason I thought the most powerful parts of the story were the use of the This was a great read in my opinion. For some reason I thought the most powerful parts of the story were the use of the word 'mask'. The face paint and camouflage the 'hunters' use created a face mask. The author writes how the boys hid behind their 'masks' and became different or even stronger boys: "The mask compelled them", pg.

I would recommend this one to anyone. View all 11 comments. It really provides a fascinating insight into how quickly chaos can ensue once civilisation ceases to exist. Really glad I finally read it!

He was quite ahead of his time to believe some of the Theme Of Humanity In Lord Of The Flies, though certainly not the majority, still remained moral despite the situation. In any case, if the Big Bad ever stumbles Substance Abuse In Emerging Adulthood shows weaknessthe Starscream Gopniks Incarceration Problem be there, ready Phaedra And Medea Essay kick Theme Of Humanity In Lord Of The Flies out Theme Of Humanity In Lord Of The Flies the Astrotrain. This leads to the devolution we see among the boys who are Theme Of Humanity In Lord Of The Flies on an uninhabited island. In the fourth instalment of the series, Harry Potter and the Goblet of FireVoldemort reappears at the start and the climax of the book. I ran away from this novel for years but it finally caught u Edit: A friend send me this article of a real situation where a group of kids Theme Of Humanity In Lord Of The Flies left stranded on an Theme Of Humanity In Lord Of The Flies for 15 months.

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